HRC research project with British Institute of International and Comparative Law (BIICL)on the determinants of anti-trafficking efforts – National Research Consultants for the case study on Bahrain

The British Institute of International and Comparative Law (BIICL) is implementing a research project on the determinants of anti-trafficking efforts. This project aims at answering the practical question asked by anti-trafficking actors, namely, “what is likely to result in positive changes to anti-trafficking efforts?”

The overall goal of the project is to improve anti-trafficking efforts by national governments globally. The research will assess the links and sequencing of factors that have led to improved political will and capacity in national governments to address trafficking in persons. Beyond looking at existing indicators, the project goes to the source and captures the views of experts and stakeholders working in counter-trafficking at the national level, including legislators, policy makers and service providers. The BIICL project is a two-year project funded by the US Department of State (Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons).

In order to achieve the objective set out above, the project will undertake a series of inter-related activities, including a series of case studies implemented by National Research Consultants (Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Brazil, Mozambique, Chile, Cyprus, Georgia, Guyana, the Philippines, Thailand, the United Kingdom).

The HRC team of Khalil Buhazaa, Ali Adenwala, and Mina Chiang have been appointed as National Research Consultants for the case study on Bahrain until September 2021. The case study involves indepth, cross-temporal, national level desk research including analysis of policy documents and travaux préparatoires of such policies and legislation, approximately 15 interviews with relevant experts and stakeholders, and focus group discussions.

Stakeholders consulted will include people working for governments, academics, lawyers, service providers, and those working for relevant NGOs and other civil society organisations. The team will analyse the factors that have yielded improved political will and capacity in national governments to address trafficking in persons, and the existed efforts being put into measures to combat different forms of trafficking.